Attentional Bias in Depression and Anxiety:The Eff..., 2011

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Title
Attentional Bias in Depression and Anxiety:The Effects of Negative Mood Induction on Emotional Processing
Date
2011
Material Type
Undergraduate Research
Creator/Author
Cox, Kayla
Copyright
Copyright 2011 by Kayla Cox. In accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code, Copyright Law of the United States of America, this material is copyrighted, and any further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without the permission of the copyright owner.
Subject
Attention; Mood (Psychology); Visual perception; Recognition (Psychology); Depression, Mental; Anxiety;
Description
Thirty two participants completed a laboratory study which included reaction time trials of morphing facial videos that transformed from neutral to an emotion (sad, happy, surprised, disgust, or angry). Additional trials represented indeterminate faces of blended disgust-happy expressions. In between two sets of 90 morphing trials, participants responded to a series 15 negative mood inducing open ended questions. Accuracy and reaction time data were analyzed as a function of reported levels of depression. Those reporting greater levels of depression were slower in reaction time to most faces but were quicker to identify disgust faces and were more likely to label happy-disgust indeterminate faces as disgust in the post mood induction morphing trials. These results provide modest support for the hypothesized effect of negative mood induction in emotional recognition. McNair Scholar project. Faculty Advisor: Stuart Quirk.
Language
English
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